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The Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013

These Regulations are due to come into force on 13 June 2014 and will apply to all contracts that traders enter into with consumers after that date. The Regulations replace the provisions that are currently in place under the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000 and the Cancellation of Contracts Made in a Consumer’s Home or Place of Work etc Regulations 2008.

A consumer for the purposes of the Regulations is an individual acting outside of their trade, business craft or profession.

How do the new Regulations apply to lettings agents?

The Regulations do not apply to tenancy agreements as Regulation 6(1) (d) specifically excludes contracts for rental of accommodation for residential purposes from their scope. However, terms of business with landlords are potentially caught.

What is required?

The Regulations distinguish between three types of contracts and require different initial information to be given or made available to the consumer:

1. On Premises Contracts – Regulation 9

These are defined as contracts that are concluded otherwise than at a distance or by way of an off premises contract.

So, all contracts concluded at a lettings agent’s premises. The Regulations require the trader to give or make available the information set out in Schedule 1 of the Regulations.

The information does not necessarily have to form part of the terms of business document but the agent will need to be able to prove that the information was given and it must be in a clear a comprehensible form.

2. Off Premises Contracts – Regulation 10

These are defined as contracts that are either negotiated and concluded in the physical presence of both the trader and the consumer off of business premises; or concluded at a distance following the consumer making an offer in the physical presence of the trader.

The Regulations require the trader to give or make available to the consumer the information set out in Schedule 2 of the Regulations.

Again, the information does not have to be in the contract so long as proof that the information has been given in a clear and comprehensible form is kept.

The trader must in addition give the consumer the cancellation form contained at Part B of Schedule 3 of the Regulations on paper.

3. Distance Contracts – Regulation 13

These are defined as contracts concluded under an organised distance selling/service provision scheme without the physical presence of the consumer and the trader at any time.

So, none of the negotiations or offers have been conducted face to face.

The Regulations require the trader to give or make available to the consumer the information set out in Schedule 2 of the Regulations.

The requirements are the same as off premises contracts (as above) in terms of the provision of the information and the cancellation form. In addition, the trader will need to send confirmation of the contract in a “durable medium” and keep proof that the confirmation of instruction was sent out.

There are additional specific requirements for contracts concluded by electronic means or on the telephone.

What are the consumer’s cancellation rights?

For off premises and distance contracts, the consumer has the right to cancel the contract at any time during 14 days without giving a reason unless the consumer requests early supply of service in accordance with Regulation 36(4).

There are a number of exceptions to the right to cancel but none of these will apply to most terms of business – Regulation 27 and 28.

The trader should not begin service until after the cancellation period unless the consumer expressly requests this. If this has not been requested and the consumer cancels within the 14 days, the trader is required to reimburse the consumer for all costs paid by the consumer already under the contract without imposing any fees.

If the consumer does requests that the supply of service begins during the cancellation period, the consumer may still cancel within the 14 day period but will be required to pay for the service on a pro rata basis. If the service has been fully performed before cancellation, the consumer will cease to have the right to cancel.

What are the implications of failing to give the required information?

1. If the required information about fees is not given to the consumer, he or she will not be liable for them;
2. The 14 day cancellation period is extended until either 14 days after the information is given or at 12 months, whichever is the earlier;
3. The trader will be guilty of an offence under Regulation 19 if it fails to give notice of the right to cancel and will be liable to a fine.

Conclusion

Agents would be advised to update their terms of business from June to make sure all of the information required and the notice of cancellation is included. The complete Regulations and schedules can be found here

2 Comments

  • Nikki Lewis 16th April 2014 at 2:09 pm

    Hi,

    Thanks for the information on this.

    Typically, when a landlord signs our terms of business, we commence marketing their property immediately. We’ll often find tenants within the 14-day cancellation period, which means the landlord will be liable for our letting fee.

    So, if our terms of business were to include a clause along the lines of “I, the client, expressly request CPS Homes to commence with this service immediately”, do you think that will cover us in the above event?

    I’m trying to avoid a situation whereby we find tenants and the landlord then pulls the plug within the 14-day cancellation period, leaving us without payment for our services.

    Thanks in advance for any advice you may be able to offer.

    Nikki.

    Nikki Lewis MARLA Woodville Road Branch 02920 574731 cpshomes.co.uk

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    • PainSmith 13th May 2014 at 3:21 pm

      If your client requests in writing ( in “durable form”) that you start work within that 14 days cancellation period, and then cancels, you would be entitled to charge for the services you have provided on a pro-rata basis.

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